Chloë tells EW ‘Big Love’ comments were taken out of context

Looks like that A.V. Club interview is causing quite an unexpected stir in the media!

Yesterday, we posted a link to the A.V.Club interview with Chloë Sevigny that’s been making big headlines in the press lately. The ruckus that followed the publication of the interview has to do with Chloë’s critical view on the colorful fourth season of HBO’s Big Love, the star of which she is alongside Bill Paxton, Jeanne Tripplehorn and Ginnifer Goodwin, which she expressed accordingly in the interview.

The relevant interview excerpts from AVClub.com:

The A.V. Club: This past season of Big Love has taken a lot of flak for being so over-the-top.
Chloë Sevigny: It was awful this season, as far as I’m concerned. I’m not allowed to say that! [Gasps.] It was very telenovela. I feel like it kind of got away from itself. The whole political campaign seemed to me very farfetched. I mean, I love the show, I love my character, I love the writing, but I felt like they were really pushing it this last season. And with nine episodes, I think they were just squishing too much in. HBO only gave us nine Sundays, because they have so much other original programming—especially with The Pacific—and they only have a certain amount of Sundays per year, so we only got nine Sundays. I think that they had more story than episodes. I think that’s what happened.

[…] Me and the girls [Jeanne Tripplehorn and Ginnifer Goodwin] definitely were not very happy with where it was going—or more kind of, “We really hope it’s going to work. It seems like they’re really pushing it.” I think next season, they’re going to go back to more just the family. I think that the stuff with Ben and Lois and that stuff was really great in Mexico, but… [Laughs.]

[…] AVC: Like how J.J.’s trying to inject her with an incest baby?
CS: Oh God, I know. Oh, God. It’s too much. It’s too much. But I hope the fans will stick with us and tune in next year. There’s a lot of people who really love this season, surprisingly. God, I’m going to get in so much trouble. [Laughs.]

Since the interview was published a few days ago, a ton(!) of press outlets have picked up and flagged the above comments, causing such an uproar in the media that it has prompted both the HBO and Chloë to react (and retract). First, the HBO issued this official statement via Entertainment Weekly:

Continue reading “Chloë tells EW ‘Big Love’ comments were taken out of context”

Chloë talks ‘Big Love’ Season 4, ‘Barry Munday’ to The A.V. Club

Here’s an interview that’s been making headlines lately!

Chloë Sevigny recently talked about her most recent work, including Barry Munday and Big Love, to The A.V. Club, the interview which is now available on their website. What many press and gossip outlets have found noteworthy about this interview, however, is the honest criticism Chloë directs towards the fourth season of Big Love, which wrapped up a couple of weeks ago. As most of you will know, Chloë recently won a Golden Globe for her role of Nicolette “Nicki” Grant on the show.

Although the full interview a AVClub.com is definitely worth a read as well, here’s the excerpt that’s been making the news these past few days:

AVC: This past season of Big Love has taken a lot of flak for being so over-the-top.
CS: It was awful this season, as far as I’m concerned. I’m not allowed to say that! [Gasps.] It was very telenovela. I feel like it kind of got away from itself. The whole political campaign seemed to me very farfetched. I mean, I love the show, I love my character, I love the writing, but I felt like they were really pushing it this last season. And with nine episodes, I think they were just squishing too much in. HBO only gave us nine Sundays, because they have so much other original programming—especially with The Pacific—and they only have a certain amount of Sundays per year, so we only got nine Sundays. I think that they had more story than episodes. I think that’s what happened.

AVC: It sort of became like Mormon Dynasty.
CS: [Laughs.] I know, I know. I’ve heard a lot of other things like that.

AVC: What was it like when they first laid out what they wanted to accomplish this season? What was your reaction?
CS: They don’t. We only get it episode to episode. We never know what’s going to happen in the next episode until we’re almost finished shooting the one we’re shooting at present. Me and the girls [Jeanne Tripplehorn and Ginnifer Goodwin] definitely were not very happy with where it was going—or more kind of, “We really hope it’s going to work. It seems like they’re really pushing it.” I think next season, they’re going to go back to more just the family. I think that the stuff with Ben and Lois and that stuff was really great in Mexico, but… [Laughs.]

AVC: A part of the show’s initial appeal was how it at least tried to stay grounded in some semblance of reality. Now that it’s gotten away from that, how do you keep things from turning into self-parody?
CS: I guess I just focus on it from scene to scene. Like, “Why is she behaving like this in this scene?” She’s a very particular, peculiar character, when you think of her circumstances. And this season, she was going through an adolescence that she never had, acting out, and vicariously living through her daughter, and realizing stuff she missed out on, and trying to find herself with the different looks. I think it was a very complicated season for her. And you know, the whole relationship with the daughter, and then J.J. [Laughs.] There’s always so much going on.

AVC: Like how J.J.’s trying to inject her with an incest baby?
CS: Oh God, I know. Oh, God. It’s too much. It’s too much. But I hope the fans will stick with us and tune in next year. There’s a lot of people who really love this season, surprisingly. God, I’m going to get in so much trouble. [Laughs.]

AVC: Even before this season, Nicki has seemed like a really difficult character to play, because her behavior is always being influenced by other men, and what she wants tends to fluctuate. How does that affect your motivation?
CS: I mean, there’s not much I can do. It is how it’s written, and I have to work it out and figure out why she’s doing the things she is. The creators are very articulate, and they help us a lot. If we have questions, like “Why? What’s the motivation?” they can like [Snaps her fingers.] in a second tell you, and it makes complete sense. I don’t know if you’ve watched any of their post-show interviews, but they’re really bright men, and they make it all make sense in your head. I just try to think how she would react in a particular circumstance. I think like, going to D.C., she brought the gun because she read about D.C., and she thought it was the most violent town in America—which it is, one of the most violent cities in America. [Laughs.] Her having the gun doesn’t seem that farfetched to me.

Well, I for one loved my weekly dose of Mormon Dynasty this season! So much fun. (Right up until the crazy finale anyway.)

Chloë covers Russian ‘Harper’s Bazaar’ April 2010

Looks like that Korean Bazaar photoshoot will make another reappearance, as Chloë Sevigny is currently featured on the cover of the April 2010 issue of Russian Harper’s Bazaar. Although the cover shot specifically is new to us, it originates from the Pavel Havlicek-photographed shoot that premiered in the February 2010 issue of the magazine’s Korean counterpart. If you’d like to refresh your memory, check out the photos we have from the shoot, as featured in both the Korean and Singaporean magazines, at our gallery.

If anyone would like to help us by sending in their scans from this issue, please do so as we might be unable to obtain this issue where we live. Thank you!

New Photo Albums:

Magazines in 2010 > ‘Harper’s Bazaar’ (Ru) April 2010 Scans

Cinematical interviews Chloë at SXSW 2010

More press material from the SXSW 2010 festival!

The people at Cinematical, who also recently posted a positive review on Barry Munday, caught up with the film’s star Chloë Sevigny the day after its SXSW world premiere to discuss the production of the film as well as that of Chloë’s second SXSW movie, Mr. Nice. The interview offers a lot of new insight into the respective productions from Chloë’s perspective, and she also talks about her career overall, who she’d like to work with in the future and how she chooses her roles.

Read the article in full at Cinematical.com; excerpts follow:

Cinematical: How did you find yourself involved with Barry Munday to begin with?
Chloe Sevigny: My agent was a supporter of the film from the beginning. She read the script and was very enthusiastic about it and sent it to me; I actually read for the part of Ginger first, and then it went to Judy [Greer]. We had a really great meeting, I really loved Chris, and we got along really well. He came back to me saying Judy’s going to play Ginger, but would you be interested in playing Jennifer? And I thought, why not? I think I’ve been playing a character you love to hate on Big Love, and on the big screen I’d like to try something along those lines but a bit different. In the movie, I think Jennifer’s character is funny because she’s kind of a seductress. It was kind of interesting to play that kind of bitchy role.

[…] Cinematical: Patrick Wilson’s performance was surprising in that he’s funnier than anyone might expect, and pulls off the feat of being the world’s biggest douche bag and being likable at the same time.
Chloe Sevigny: Obviously, he’s a dramatic actor. I had no idea how he was going to play the role until I showed up and saw him improvising, walking around pulling these faces. Oh my god, it was too funny. He’s more than funny. I was really impressed with him. I guess he’s honed that on the stage but I’ve never seen him on the stage doing comedy before, so I was really surprised and impressed. I said, you’d better get ready to make a lot of money, because a lot of people are going to be calling you to do big comedies.

Cinematical: You’ve got not one, but two films at SXSW. What was your experience like shooting Mr. Nice, and how much more crazy is your SXSW schedule with two films in the festival?
Chloe Sevigny: Having two films has happened to me a lot in the past over the years at different festivals; it just means more work. Mr. Nice is a biopic about a drug smuggler named Howard Marks. Rhys Ifans stars. It was very improvisational, the shooting, and the director is kind of a wild man; he didn’t want to rehearse or block any scenes. Sometimes he wouldn’t even let us see the room we were going to do the scene in until we walked in to shoot. It was very challenging, because I was also doing a British accent. I rehearsed on my own over and over again, but then Rhys of course improvised and I would have to try and respond in a British accent, with improvisation! It was very hard for me, I’d never done that before. But I really love Bernard, I think he’s a great filmmaker and it was really fun to shoot that way.

[…]Cinematical: Have you consciously avoided taking mainstream roles?
Chloe Sevigny: Not necessarily. People like to project that on me, but it’s not necessarily true. If it was right, with the right director and the right material. I usually choose my projects depending on the director and who else is involved, and I’ve worked for the most part with writer-directors throughout my career.

Cinematical: Which directors out there would you like to work with that you haven’t had a chance to?
Chloe Sevigny: Jane Campion, or the Coen brothers.

First reviews on ‘Barry Munday’ from SXSW 2010

Since its Saturday world premiere at the SXSW 2010, reviews on the Chris D’Arienzo-directed comedy Barry Munday have begun surfacing online — and we have been most pleased to find them largely positive! Out of 9 reviews we have so far read, only two have been negative, and a few have even commended Chloë Sevigny for her role of Jennifer Farley in the film, a supporting role though it is.

Below is a list of reviews we’ve so far uncovered and read; all comments on Chloë’s performance in the film have been cited here:

“It helps that their family members are played by veterans Malcolm McDowell, Cybill Shepherd, Jean Smart, and Chloe Sevigny, the latter at her most playfully smoldering.”
– Peter Martin, Cinematical

“[…] with Cybill Shephard, Malcom McDowell, and Chloe Sevigny all doing solid supporting work that can be both broad and hilarious at times and nuanced and real at others. […] and even Chloe Sevigny seems light and charming here.”
– Drew McWeeny, HitFix.com

“Judy Greer is also great as the homely mother-to-be, and Chloe Sevigny and Malcolm McDowell (as Ginger’s younger sister and father, respectively) bring life to otherwise paper-thin characters, but this is Wilson’s show. And when you’re playing the title character of a movie that proudly presents his name in all caps, that’s the way it should be.”
– Jason Zingale, TV.com

External Links to Barry Munday Reviews:

CinemaBlend.com (positive review; Chloë’s performance not mentioned)
Cinematical (positive review; Chloë’s performance mentioned)
ComingSoon.net (positive review + filmmaker interview; Chloë’s performance not mentioned)
Entertainment Weekly (positive review; Chloë’s performance not mentioned)
Film School Rejects (positive review; Chloë’s performance not mentioned)
HitFix.com (positive review; Chloë’s performance mentioned)
IndieWire (negative review; Chloë’s performance not mentioned)
The Hollywood Reporter (via Reuters) (negative review; Chloë’s performance not mentioned)
TV.com (positive review; Chloë’s performance mentioned)